North verses South in Italy: from stereotypes to rampant individualism

 

North Verses South Italy

To be honest I am tired of the North verses South debate in Italy and I felt nauseous when COSI’ chose it as this month’s subject, simply because there is nothing new you can say about this subject without reaffirming stereotypes and clichés about Italy, which is why I am ambling in late with my contribution to the discussion.

So here goes …

Yes, there is a difference between Northern and Southern Italy; in fact it took a major political and social movement to merge the different states of the Italian peninsula in the nineteenth century. The process began with the congress of Vienna at the end of Napoleon’s reign in 1815 and continued with various revolutions and internal conflicts to finally proclaim Rome as the capital of the Kingdom on Italy in 1871.

The reason the ‘Risorgimento’ period took so long to put Italy together is simply because each Italian region is really so unique, even today there is a strong cultural individualism which makes it difficult to group Italians together. It may be a pithy example but just look how each region has its own different cuisine each town has its own type of pasta, wine, cheeses, festivals, traditions and even dialect.

Italian dialects are not simply variations in accents they are different languages, so its normal there is going to be some cultural conflicts there.

A personal example of mine are my own parents, my Dad was born on the Adriatic coastal town of Vasto in the Abruzzo region of central Italy and his dialect is heavy with Croatian and Greek influences. While my mother, born in Sicily and speaks a dialect peppered with diverse influences from Arabic, Turkish, Norman and German (Sicily boasts thirteen distinct foreign dominations in their history each of which has left its mark on the Sicilian language). So if my folks speak their dialects they won’t understand one another, even if standardised Florentine Italian is taught in the schools, dialects are strong in the homes and Italian is spoken with deep regional accents.

Unification of Italy infographic
Taken from Wikipedia

Italians are staunchly parochial, the phenomenon of campanilismo is an important aspect of life in Italy it creates a sense of identity, pride and belonging to the place of your birth with a pinch of local rivalry which is stronger than any sense of national identity.

The geographical isolation between one town and the other thanks to the Italian Alps doesn’t exactly help with unifying the various sub cultures and actually magnifies the Italians sense of distance from their compatriots. I am constantly bemused when Sicilians compare cities from different parts of the same province as if they are talking about two different countries.

Then we come to all the stereotypes like these I have overheard in conversations through my years living in Italy:

Northerners are cold and calculating.
Southerners are lazy and corrupt.
Northerners are efficient and money hungry.
Southerners are inefficient and poor.
In reality these problems exist in both the North and South and such generalisations are nonsense.

Matteo Salvini the ultra-conservative and current leader of the Lega Nord political party is a creation of the Umberto Bossi separatist movement of the 1980’s/90’s which attempted to cut Italy into two pieces. According to the Lega the South has sponged off the North’s industry and would be better off without them. On the flip side Raffaele Lombardo’s independent Sicily movement was seeking the succession of Sicily from Italy after centuries of underdevelopment on the island. Neither have succeeded in their bids, Salvini recently trawling Sicily for votes in the next upcoming election and Lombardo is being dragged through the courts on corruption charges.

Italy is such a rich place which has been inhabited by human beings since Palaeolithic times, each generation layering itself upon the one before, creating endless complexities which link Italian together and create a rampant form of individualism associated with closely linked communities and families.

The North verses South debate is a result of this complex tapestry.

 

wcm0046

 COSI’ is currently discussing North verses South in Italy.

If you want to join in the fun, use our hashtag #COSItaly.

For your ease and comfort, we’ve added a COSÌ Facebook Page so that you can access all of our articles in one location.

4 thoughts on “North verses South in Italy: from stereotypes to rampant individualism

  1. I would recommend this book for anyone wanting a good, concise and readable history of Italy.

    The Pursuit of Italy: A History of a Land, Its Regions, and Their Peoples
    by David Gilmour
    2012

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Very well said. It too complex an issue to fully understand or explain, but you have covered it well. I have lived in the south and the centre of Italy and I can see differences, but also many similarities. People are people, and everyone is different. I will never understand the way Italians think, but I love the place anyway.

    Like

    1. Thanks Debra. Yes Italy is a complex country and the whole Nord verses Sud debate is simply yet another complexity which adds to the beauty and confusion of it all. And despite it all we do love it!

      Like

Comments are closed